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Port-Tales – An artistic response to Irish emigrant stories from the Imirce digital collection

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Archives and heritage collections are enduring, authentic and reliable sources of information, but in the 21st century, it is clearer than ever that they cannot remain static, resisting reinterpretation. Art and cultural productions provide an invitation to engage with complex stories and subjective experience, and increase knowledge and understanding of the past in a way that the realm of history and heritage (certain, quantifiable) finds difficult to achieve on its own. Unlike historical records that are sealed documents of the past, art proposes a continuation of historical moments by pulling them into the present in meaningful ways. Following the launch of the Imirce repository of Irish emigrant letters and memoirs in March 2024, Eibhlίn Göppert and David Burke selected letters from the Kerby A. Miller Collection to underpin an exhibition that creatively explores the enduring themes of migration.  The Exhibition  Port-Tales (2024) is a collaborative exhibition by artist Eibhlίn G

National Open Access Repository Project: Advancing Towards OpenAIRE Metadata Alignment

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Introduction In recent years, Ireland has emerged as a highly active research ecosystem in the global drive towards full open access infrastructure and transparent research practices. The National Open Access Repository Project is one of the six pilot projects funded by the National Open Research Forum (NORF) to transition Ireland to 100% open access by 2030, now complemented by a further thirteen projects .  As an important output of this project’s data gathering and analysis phase, in March 2024 the project team published Advancing Ireland’s Open Repository Landscape: A Strategic Roadmap . Building on a 2023 project report, Advancing Open Repositories in Ireland: A Survey and Strategic Recommendations for National Progress . This roadmap is a detailed examination of the current state of open repositories within Ireland and provides valuable insights into the hurdles the repository community faces, the potential opportunities for alignment and advancement, and the roadmap for futur

Celebrating 800 Years of Dominican Life in Ireland

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The historic Dominican Convent Library at the University of Galway This month of April, the Dominicans in Galway are celebrating the 800th anniversary of the arrival of the Dominican Order in Ireland. In 1224, Dominican friars from Oxford and London established communities in Dublin and Drogheda, having sailed up the Liffey and the Boyne rivers. In 1241, they set up house in Athenry and in 1488 they took over a ruined abbey on the banks of the Corrib. The Dominican Sisters established a convent in Galway city in 1644 in New Tower Street, now known as St Augustine Street. In 2018, the Dominican Convent in Taylor’s Hill, Galway donated its library of more than 2,000 volumes, built up over five centuries, to University of Galway. Spanning almost five centuries, the library contains a selection of significant religious publications from the 17th Century onwards and was almost lost due to a convent building demolition. The University worked closely with the Dominican Convent to secure t

Imirce is LIVE - Thousands of Irish emigrant letters now available online

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The University of Galway Library is pleased to announce that Imirce is now live. Imirce is a digital repository of thousands of Irish emigrant letters and memoirs dating from the late 1600s through to the mid-20th century. The letters and memoirs were collected from the Irish diaspora community in the U.S. and Ireland over five decades of research by Kerby A. Miller, Emeritus Professor of History at University of Missouri and Honorary Professor of History at University of Galway. Miller donated his collection to the University of Galway Library in 2021. Visit Imirce at imirce.universityofgalway.ie . The initial phase of Imirce has concentrated on organising the collection of emigrant letters gathered by Kerby A. Miller and establishing a digital platform for these documents. The Kerby A. Miller Collection totals more than 150,000 pages, including approximately 7,000 letters, along with other important historical documents from Irish emigrants and their relatives, such as memoirs, gene

University of Galway Staff Publications - a Library Display

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To showcase recent publications by University of Galway staff, we have gathered a selection of titles for display on the ground floor of the Library. The displayed titles provide a snapshot of the research currently taking place in the University. The Library aims to acquire a physical copy and e-book (if available) of every publication by University of Galway academic staff.  If you have a new book due to be published, please let us know via the  Purchase Request form  (or alternatively email acquisitions@universityofgalway.ie). Collection Development /  Forbairt Bailiúchán

New titles in Artificial Intelligence - a Reading List

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    As part of expanding the Library's resources in Artificial Intelligence, we have ordered a range of new e-books covering the experience and application of AI to higher education. These titles cover some of the following subjects:  introduction  AI in education academic integrity  pedagogy case studies For added ease of access we have a created a  browsable reading list of these new titles. All titles are also available from the Library Catalogue  along with many other resources about Artificial Intelligence from our collections.                                                      Collection Development

A step closer to the new Library and Learning Commons

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Next week sees a major milestone in the journey towards a new Library and Learning Commons for the University of Galway.   Planning permission was received back in August 2023 for this landmark building for the University campus and Tuesday February 6th, will see enabling works commence on the riverside site of the new building.   This will include the closure of a small car park to the south of the Kingfisher and preparations begin for the demolition of existing sheds and buildings to make way for the new building.   The new Library and Learning Commons is a development that will be welcomed by the University’s student community, who have been crying out for spaces that are more conducive to modern learning needs.   The current James Hardiman Library opened its doors 50 years ago, at a time when learning was a solitary affair and information access was through print journals and hard-copy books.   Learning in the 21 st Century is more collaborative, more technology-enabled and more c