Thursday, 20 July 2017

Celebrating the Galway International Arts Festival - From the Archives


The Galway International Arts Festival is celebrating 40 years this year. Over those many years the Festival has grownt o become not just the highlight of Galway's cultural and artistic calendar every but also that of Ireland, now recognised as one of the major annual arts festivals in Europe.

The archive of the Galway International Arts Festival resides within the archive collections of the Hardiman Library of NUI Galway. It is an amazing record of how the festival was established and grew to attract not just the best of Irish artists and performers of all kinds, but also the cream of international talent. The collection consists of over thirty-five boxes of manuscripts and documents, comprising some of the first minute books of the Festival committee, correspondence with leading artists, programmes and posters for various events, an expansive photographic collection, press cuttings and of course the famous Galway Arts Festival posters themselves.

The archive of Galway Arts Festival includes a detailed record of administration, productions and events held during the Galway Arts Festival since its inception in 1978. The collection includes records which document the establishment and early years of the Galway Arts Festival and follows its growth and expansion into one of Europe's largest multi-disciplinary arts festivals. In the administrative records there are editions of minutes from Galway Arts Festival committee and management meetings 1980-1982. Financial records from this time also document the income and expenditure of the Galway Arts Festival and the Galway Arts Group as well as detailing levels and requirements of sponsorship for the Galway Arts Festival. The production files include a high volume of excellent quality photographs from full productions and events across all disciplines in the Galway Arts Festival. The photographs are black and white and also colour and cover theatre, comedy, dance, music, literature, visual art, street events and children's events. 




A series of slides also present a visual element to this collection. The Galway Arts Festival archive boasts a large volume of posters and other promotional ephemeral material. This outsize material relates to full productions in the Galway Arts Festival and also publicity material issued by the Galway Arts Festival. The series of press files contain records of local (Galway and West of Ireland) press cuttings of interviews with and features on members of Galway Arts Festival directors and management, reviews of productions and events at the Festival and news on Arts, theatre and culture in general nationwide around Ireland. This series of records is complemented by a series of press releases that document the information given to media at the outset of the Galway Arts Festival. A detailed and comprehensive list of events in various codes including theatre, music, visual art, children's events, literature provide an account of all acts which performed each year at the Galway Arts Festival.



The records reveal just how much the people of Galway, the West and from much further afield have been an active part of the spectacle of the festival. Images of crowded streets and venues across the city show how audiences have been enthralled by all the Festival has to offer for all tastes and interests. The archive also compliments other related local artistic and cultural archives, such as those of Druid Theatre, Taibhdhearc na Gaillimhe, Macnas and many more, building a comprehensive memory of the Arts in Galway for over the past four decades.

A full listing of the Galway Arts Festival archive is available on the Library online catalogue

For any visitors to the Galway International Arts Festival and are curious about this amazing archive collection, please do contact the Archives service for information on access.


Monday, 17 July 2017

Academic Video Online - trial now available

A trial of Academic Video Online (Alexander Street Press) is now available until Friday 28 July 2017.

Academic Video Online delivers 55,000+ streaming video titles spanning a wide range of subject areas including film, drama, literary studies, business, counselling, history, music, and more. Curated for the educational experience, the large depth of content and breadth of content types (such as documentaries, films, demonstrations, etc.) makes it a useful resource for undergraduate and postgraduate teaching and research.

Access to Academic Video Online is available at: http://library.nuigalway.ie/collections/databases/databasetrials/

Please complete the feedback form provided for this trial if this resource is of interest.



Collection Development

Thursday, 13 July 2017

Archives Unbound - access extended


Access to Archives Unbound has now been extended until 30 November 2017. At that stage the usage will be reviewed and perpetual access to the most accessed collections will be selectively purchased. 

Archives Unbound consists of a collection of 237 unique digitised primary sources covering a broad range of historical areas including:

  • Colonial and Postcolonial Studies
  • European History
  • French Language Titles
  • Gender Studies
  • Irish History
  • Middle East Studies
  • World War II
 
Archival source documents include personal correspondence, government files and reports, pamphlets, speeches and memoranda from a range of historical periods.
 
Browse the title list of collections on Archives Unbound.
 
 
Collection Development

Thursday, 6 July 2017

Routledge History of Feminism - new resource

 
Routledge History of Feminism is a new online resource that covers the fascinating subject of feminism over the long nineteenth century (1776–1928). 
 
It contains an extensive range of primary and secondary resources, including full books, selected chapters, and journal articles, as well as new thematic essays, and subject introductions on its structural themes:


Millicent Fawcett's Hyde Park address
  • Politics and Law
  • Religion and Belief
  • Education
  • Literature and Writings
  • Women at Home
  • Society and Culture
  • Empire
  • Movements and Ideologies
 
 
 
 
 


Key Features:
  • More than 170 volumes of primary source collections, available in electronic format for the first time
  • More than 1,000 chapters of secondary book content
  • Over 100 journal articles from a range of Taylor and Francis journals
  • An introductory video to the subject and resource from the Academic Editor
  • 16 newly commissioned thematic essays by experts in the field
  • Short introductions that outline the 8 key subject categories
  • An image gallery to aid research and study
  • Browsing available by Subject, Region, Period and Notable Figures
 
Access to Routledge History of Feminism is available here.
 
Take a virtual tour here
 
 
 
Collection Development

Friday, 30 June 2017

The Reading List Service - helping students access course materials

The Reading List Service is our core facility for ensuring students can access their course materials. It integrates: 
  • library resources & library ordering 
  • reading lists
  • Blackboard

The service saves academics time by: 
  • ordering books/ebooks on your behalf 
  • checking links to journal articles
  • providing chapter and article scanning
  • offering reports of student engagement
  • view a Reading List example 
Over the past year: 
  • 2200 items on reading lists were checked (including 1100 e-links)
  • More than 500 new books ordered
  • More than 200 book loan periods changed
Students find our Reading List Service helps them seamlessly access their course materials. In our survey:
  • 95% agreed they are more likely to read items from their reading list when they are easily accessible
  • 71% agreed or strongly agreed that the Reading List System makes preparing for exams, essays and projects more straightforward
  • The module list MG328 Human Resource Management, was viewed almost 1500 times

Using the Service
Please email readinglists@nuigalway.ie if you are interested in using the Reading List Service.


More information about using our Reading List Service  including guides, videos and training is available from the Reading List web page.


Training
Introductory training sessions for academic staff and teaching support staff:
Every Thursday, 12pm-115pm
Library Training Room
Book a place


Collection Development

Friday, 23 June 2017

Sociologists in Muintir na Tíre

Muintir na Tíre pioneered and were involved in promoting many new concepts and technologies in its 80 year history. They were involved in rural electrification, group water schemes, community alert and community development. They had prominent Irish sociologists involved in the organisation in the 1940s to the 1990s. Among these were Jeremiah Newman, Bishop of Limerick, Dr Thomas Morris, Archbishop of Cashel and Emly and Tomas Roseingrave.

Within the Muintir na Tíre collection we are lucky to have the papers relating to Muintir na Tíre of Dr Thomas Morris and of Tomas Roseingrave. We do have correspondence from Jeremiah Newman but these are contained in the correspondence of Muintir na Tíre not his own papers.

Dr Thomas Morris was the National Recording Secretary of Muintir na Tíre. He was Vice President of the diocesan seminary, St Patrick’s college in Thurles and became Archbishop of Cashel and Emly in 1960. In the archive we have correspondence that was received by Dr Morris with regard to the work of Muintir na Tíre, his role as editor of Landmark and with regard to his views on sociology, rural Ireland and community development.

He was concerned with the internal organisation and structures of Muintir na Tíre and produced papers on how the secretary should work, the use of filing systems and the structures of guilds. 


In the 1940s and 1950s the Catholic Church were vocal against Communism across Europe. This view was supported by both Canon Hayes and Dr Morris who spoke out against communism in Ireland. Below we have an example from a paper written by Dr Morris on this.


He also looked at community development in rural Ireland. One of the papers in the archive is ‘Organisation of Rural Workers’ which looks at the history and structure of the agricultural industry, growth of workers’ associations and the parish organisation in Muintir na Tíre.


The other prominent sociologist involved in Muintir na Tíre was Tomas Roseingrave, who had a Master’s Degree in social science from UCD. He was Director of manpower studies in the Department of Labour. In 1968 he became the second National Director of Muintir na Tíre. He resigned from the post in 1975 but continued on as consultant National Director and was involved until his death in 1993. In 1973 he became a member of the EEC Economic and Social Committee where he was President in the 1981.

Roseingrave was a constant in Muintir na Tíre from 1968 to his death in 1993. His work as National Director included setting the direction of the organisation, developing policy and organising the administration and staff.  He communicated with various organisations and government departments on behalf of Muintir na Tíre and also represented them on various committees and bodies.


He also led a number of Muintir na Tíre projects. As the lead on the E.E.C. Pilot project the Community Development Officers reported to him on their work. The outcome of this was the report Pilot Scheme on Training Programme for Community Development Officers. 


He also wrote many paper on community development. Below is an example of an article he wrote for Community Focus in 1979 



and this paper published in 1974. 





In his role on the Economic and Social Committee he became well versed on European issues and was a support of Ireland joining the E.E.C. He was very concerned with community development and the improvement of rural life and decreasing the gap between rich and poor. This can be seen in his address at the Plenary Session of the Economic and Social Committee in December 1981.


Muintir na Tíre have been very lucky to have prominent sociologists involved to help develop the theme of community development down through the years. 

Wednesday, 7 June 2017

Electronic Enlightenment - new database




Electronic Enlightenment is the most wide-ranging online collection of edited correspondence of the early modern period, linking people across Europe, the Americas and Asia from the early 17th to the mid-19th century. The content includes:

•8,560 correspondents
•53 nationalities from Europe, Asia & the Americas
•777 occupations
•70,057 letters and documents
•Information on 64,741 manuscript and 106,933 early edition sources
•319,778 scholarly annotations
•11 languages, including English, French, German & Italian
•1,476 links to and from the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
•External links to over 50 other online resources

Access to Electronic Enlightenment is available here.


Collection Development

Thursday, 1 June 2017

Muintir na Tíre's Community Development Officer - A Common Thread

As mentioned in an earlier post I spoke about getting to be the first to explore an archive. Another perk is getting to see common threads, trends in the work an organisation/person, the issues that come up over and over again and how the organisation/person worked.

In Muintir na Tíre one of the common threads throughout its 80 years in existence is the use of Community Development Officers/Community Alert Development Officers. The role has been used to spread the word and work of Muintir na Tíre in the community. The Development Officers formed guilds, community councils and community alert group with the local community. They provided advice and guidance to these and ensured they were informed of any decisions from headquarters.  

In the archive we can see the role of Organisers in the 1950s is to spread the work and word of Muintir na Tíre in communities and to from guilds. There were approximately six organisers employed by Muintir na Tíre during this time. Each week the Organiser had to submit a report to Headquarters with regard to the weeks work and note if a new guild was formed. Below is a repot from O. Reilly who covered Tipperary, Kilkenny, Kerry, Kildare and Meath. These reports give a great insight into the communities that Muintir na Tíre engaged with and the issues that were facing guilds. 


In the 1970s Community Development Officers were employed in the E.E.C. Pilot Project. Funding for the pilot project came from the European Social Fund. The project was focused on training community development workers in rural community work which led to employment opportunities through local enterprise. The project also focused on developing community councils, identifying community needs, organising local resources, linking of local resources to those available at higher levels and seeking to accommodate the local projects within the plans and programmes devised at statutory, regional and national levels of administration/organisation [Tierney p.158]. The Community Development officers advised on the creation of community councils and the identification of the needs and objectives of rural-urban societies. They operated in defined locations and worked closely with community council and provided them with training and a professional approach. A copy of Conditions of Employment for Community development officers can be seen below. They also provided weekly reports which are also in the archive.


In the 1980s there were two types of employee’s in Muintir na Tíre. One of these was the Community Development officer who continued to focus on community development, supporting community councils and creating new councils. Kevin Hickey was employed by both Headquarters and Cork County Federation and his role and achievements in Cork is described below.


The 1980s also saw the creation of Community Alert in rural Ireland in 1985. To help promote Community Alert, Muintir na Tíre employed and continues to employ Community Alert Development Officers who help establish community alert groups in local communities across Ireland. They work closely with An Garda Síochána. The Community Alert Development Officers also completed weekly work reports. Below is an example of a report from the 1990s from Pat Doyle. 



These reports provide a great insight into the development of community alert and the issues facing communities in rural Ireland.

The role of a community development officer to promote the work and word of Muintir na Tíre has been an effective tool for 80 years. This role is one of many common threads in the archive. 

Tuesday, 30 May 2017

June workshops: Design in presentations, blogging, social media

We've got some very interesting workshops for you in June! Check these out!

June 13 2-3:30: Design in Presentations
Description: This workshop will walk you through the design thinking process in the context of presentations. The attendees will leave with knowledge of tools and processes that they can use when creating presentations or other visual communication tools to make sure they are looking their best.
Facilitator Eileen Walsh has a degree in Graphic Design and a masters in Digital Media. She has worked in the area of design and digital media for the last seven years and will be sharing some of the knowledge and tools she uses when going through the design process.

More info and to sign up: https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/design-for-presentations-tickets-34888161430


June 8, 2 – 3:30: Blogging in retirement
Description: In or near retirement? Thinking about setting up a blog to let the world know about your ventures and adventures? This workshop will outline the basics of blogging. We'll provide an overview of blogging platforms, get you signed up to a blogging account and get a first blog post published. We'll also learn how to follow other peoples' blogs, and see what else we get up to (the world is your oyster, right?). The workshop will be led by Academic Skills Librarian and former Age Action Getting Started tutor Kris Meen. Open to all!

More info and to sign up: https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/blogging-in-retirement-tickets-34949398592


June 14 10-11:30: Social media for researchers (sold out!)
Description: Curious about what social media can do for your research? Interested in how it can be used in developing your research strategy, managing information, and promoting your research? Led by Kris Meen and Eileen Walsh, this workshop will provide a taste of the tools available to assist at various stages of the research process and provide a space to think through strategies to make social media work for you as a professional researcher.

More info and to sign up: https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/social-media-for-researchers-tickets-34905540411

The latter event is already sold out! If it's of interest, please put yourself on the waiting list and you may able to get a ticket pending cancellations (click on the link). If not, we will email those on the waiting list once a new workshop is in the system.

Tuesday, 16 May 2017

Digital Theatre+ is now available


https://www.digitaltheatreplus.com/plays-and-productions
 
Digital Theatre+ contains many digital productions and several educational resources including:
 
 
 
 
Digital Theatre+ will continue to expand with more contemporary & classical productions, exclusive practitioner interviews and in-depth study materials.

Access to Digital Theatre+ is available here.


Collection Development

Friday, 5 May 2017

The Muintir na Tíre Interest Group

When the James Hardiman Library was discussing the acquisition of the Muintir na Tíre archive with Tom Fitzgerald, Dr Tony Varley from the School of Political Science and Sociology and the University Librarian, John Cox contacted academics from within and outside NUIG to see what the academic interest, if any, was in the archive.

Numerous letters of support were received regarding the value of the archive and how important the archive was for social, historical, geographical and sociological research purposes. This support came from historians, sociologists, geographers and economists. Such powerful advocacy was very influential in ensuring that the University acquired the archive.


To continue the engagement with the academic supporters who were very enthused about the archive an interest group was established within the university. While the academics wait patiently and with excitement for me to finish appraising, arranging and cataloguing the archive we have invited the academics who are on campus in NUIG and colleagues from Teagasc in Athenry to attend four meetings throughout the period of the project. 



We have had two very successful meetings with the academics to date. The first meeting provided the academics with an introduction to the archive and the archival process. We informed them of the various records that are in the collection such as the National Conference material, AGM minutes, financial records, publications, annual returns provided by guilds/community councils and publications.



The second meeting provided a further update on the progress of the arrangement and cataloguing of the collection. I’m still at the arrangement phase as there are approximately 8,217 items in the collection but I am over half way there. They were also informed of some of the other finds in the collection including minutes of meetings of the National Council and National Executive, correspondence with other bodies involved in rural Ireland including IFA, ICA, ICMSA and of course government departments.


One of the main purposes of the interest group and engaging with the academics is to get them thinking about the use of the archive for teaching and research purposes. By informing them of the content of the archive they can start planning the use of the archive for undergraduate and post graduate teaching and research purposes. They might not focus all their research on Muintir na Tíre but they may wish to use some of the archive. They can inform students of the wealth of material in the archive and the possibilities of how this can enhance their research.

By engaging with academics it provides solace to this archivist and indeed the library that the archive will be used and that there is excitement about the archive being made available so that they can start using it. Expectations on when the archive will be available for use does have to be tempered but knowing that your hard work is appreciated and causing excitement does provide me with enthusiasm and enjoyment while continuing the archival process. 

Wednesday, 3 May 2017

Theatre Record: trial now available


A trial of Theatre Record is now available until Tuesday 16 May 2017.

Established in 1981, Theatre Record is the reference bible of UK theatre and the first stop for anyone – theatres, researchers, agents, critics – wanting indexed reviews from the major newspaper critics of all professional theatre productions, large and small, in and out of London, complete with cast credits and production photographs.

To access this trial click here.

Please complete the trial feedback form if this resource is of interest.




Collection Development

Tuesday, 11 April 2017

James Hardiman Library - Easter Opening Hours





To help in planning your study over the Easter weekend please see below details of the James Hardiman Library Easter opening hours:


  • Friday 14 April       10.00-18.00
  • Saturday 15 April   Closed
  • Sunday 16 April     Closed
  • Monday 17 April    10.00-18.00


The Library Reading Room at basement level will be open daily from 07.00-02.30




Tuesday, 4 April 2017

Access *restored* for Web of Science, Jrnl Citation Reports, Essential Sci Indicators

Update April 5th - Access has been restored to all affected resources.
You can access the resources as normal via the relevant links in the library catalogue.


We're currently experiencing access problems with Web of Science, Journal Citation Reports, and Essential Science Indicators.

For Web of Science, the interface can still be searched, but there's no guarantee that content in search results will be as comprehensive as it should be.
Journal Citation Reports and Essential Science Indicators are both presenting login screens and aren't authorising us at the moment.

Technical support for the resources has been contacted, and they are currently working on fixing the issue.

We'll update this blog post as events warrant. Apologies for any inconvenience!

Library E-Resources Team

Monday, 3 April 2017

International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences - new edition now available


 
Access to the online 2nd edition of the International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences (Elsevier, 2015) is now available. Fully revised and updated, this new edition of the International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences, first published in 2001, comprises over 3,900 articles and includes 90,000 bibliographic references as well as comprehensive name and subject indexes.

Key Features:

•Provides authoritative, foundational, interdisciplinary knowledge across the wide range of behavioral and social sciences fields
•Discusses history, current trends and future directions
•Topics are cross-referenced with related topics and each article highlights further reading

Access is available here.
 

Collection Development













 

Muintir na Tíre Limited

Before Muintir na Tíre was founded in 1937 by Canon John Hayes, he established a co-operative society, Muintir na Tíre Limited, in 1931. Muintir na Tíre was an agricultural producers co-operative society for farmers and their labourers.

I have discovered some records relating to Muintir na Tíre Limited during the appraisal and arranging of the Muintir na Tíre archive. This includes the minute books from 1931 – 1937 and some published material.

The minute books of Muintir na Tíre Limited note how Muintir na Tíre Limited was set up, the rules that should be followed, the prices of shares and the title of the organisation. They note the various meetings of the organisation during the years it was active and those who were involved in the organisation. 



The first entry in the first minute book is a circular announcing a meeting on March 4th 1931 “to further consider the matter of setting up an organisation which will embrace every section of Irish Agriculture and avoid political affiliation” announced the intention of setting up an organisation which would act as a parent organisation for all those involved in agriculture. It was decided at this meeting to set up such an organisation, and this became known as Muintir na Tíre Limited.

It was agreed that the association would be registered as a limited liability organisation under the Industrial and Provident Societies Act. Muintir na Tíre Limited was registered with the Register of Friendly Societies on 24th November 1931. To be registered with the Register of Friendly Societies Muintir na Tíre Limited had to produce rules. 


Muintir na Tíre Limited believed in rural self-help. The ideological basis for Muintir na Tíre Limited was the encyclical Rerum Novarum. In this the Pope was calling for greater harmony between the social classes. In Ireland this was seen as the relationship between farmer and labourer. This vision was set out by Reverend Hayes in an address to a meeting of delegates at Commercial Buildings Dublin, 7th May 1931 and published in the below booklet.



Muintir na Tíre Limited agreed the formation of branches in 1934. Rules and regulations governing the formation of branches were established.



The most successful activity of Muintir na Tíre Limited was the development of Rural Weekends. These weekends were a shortened version of Semaine Sociales held in rural France. Rural weekends developed into the Rural Weeks run by Muintir na Tíre.

Muintir na Tíre Limited was a precursor to Muintir na Tíre and many of the ideas of Canon Hayes were developed and tried out in the co-operative society. However, the co-operative was found to be too limiting and by 1937 it ceased being registered with the Registrar of Friendly Societies. Muintir na Tíre was ready to be established to promote rural communities.

While you have to wait until these records are available for research purposes you can have a read of Class, Community and Conflict: the case of Muintir na Tíre Limited by Eoin Devereux published in Tipperary Historical Journal 1995 and Father John Hayes: Founder of Muintir naTíre, People of the Land by Stephen Rynne to find out more about Muintir na Tíre Limited. Hopefully, there will be more records relating to Muintir na Tíre Limited to be discovered. 

Thursday, 30 March 2017

ARAN repository exceeds five million hits to date





ARAN has attracted over five million hits (downloads and page views) to date, leaving no doubt that adding your publications to it boosts your citations and increases the visibility of your research. It is the definitive open access showcase for research from NUI Galway. Don’t miss out on the benefits by claiming your publications on IRIS and uploading them to ARAN.






Just click on the red button (see above) beside your publications in IRIS to upload to ARAN or email your publication to aran@nuigalway.ie and we’ll upload it for you.






Upload the final draft post-refereeing without the publisher’s type-setting, formatting, logos and pagination (also known as the post-print). We check and adhere to publisher’s policies and explicitly promote and link to your published article. Very little admin is required on your part.


For advice and support email aran@nuigalway.ie


Friday, 24 March 2017

"Outside the Walls": Research in the Community
Seminar hosted by Special Collections, Hardiman Library,
 NUI, Galway


Thursday, 6 April, 14.45-17.00
 Hardiman Research Building, G011

Speakers: Marie Mannion, (County Galway Heritage Officer), Prof. Noel Wilkins, (Galway Archaeological & Historical Society), Professor Gerry Jennings (Western Family History Association), Dr. Christy Cunniffe, Archaeologist. Panel Discussion facilitated by Dr. Nessa Cronin, Irish Studies. 

Thursday, 23 March 2017

3 Database Trials End Soon

The following database trials will expire on Friday, 31 March:
 
  • Electronic Enlightenment
  • Kanopy (online films and documentaries)
  • Travel Writing, Spectacle and World History
 
These resources can be accessed via the database trials page.

Please complete the database trial feedback form provided for each resource of interest.


Collection Development

Tuesday, 21 March 2017

Martin McGuinness - In Conflict and Peace: From the Archives

The recent stepping away from active political life by Martin McGuinness and from his role as Deputy First Minister, signalled a polemic shift in the political landscape in Northern Ireland, His passing today, aged 66, has further intensified the consideration of his life and role in Northern Ireland, and his journey from conflict to peace, over many decades.

The perhaps unknown role that Martin McGuinness played, over many years, in negotiating a peaceful and sustained end to conflict in Northern Ireland can be seen within the archive of mediator Brendan Duddy. Brendan Duddy was born in Derry on 10 June 1936. He became a businessman in his native city, and by the early 1970s he owned and managed two fish-and-chip shops, one in Beechwood Avenue (Creggan) and another in William Street. Duddy knew Martin McGuinness in the 1960s when McGuinness worked for a supplier company delivering burgers to Duddy's shops - at a time when McGuinness's interest in politics was not yet kindled.
Screenshot of "Walter" material, Duddy Digital Archive, NUI Galway

At the time it would have been impossible for anyone to predict the central roles both men would play over the course of the following decades.

One section of the Duddy papers pertain to a figure known as ‘Walter'. These items, now digitised and available from the Hardiman Library, reveal the extent of efforts by "Walter"  - the active code-name for Martin McGuinness - and particularly his and Duddy's period of close co-operation in 1993. The files include detailed draft and final correspondence and memoranda sent by Brendan Duddy to McGuinness, which show the level of tense and prolonged discussions regarding the Peace Process of the early 1990s and the later Good Friday Agreement of 1998. The files also include other items such as relevant newspaper cuttings focusing on McGuinness.

Telex from Duddy to McGuinness, 1999

Examples include a dossier of three letters from Brendan Duddy to Martin McGuinness, previously sent 21 March - 19 June 1999, copied by telefax to an unidentified recipient in September 1999, detailing the central role and importance played by McGuinness in peace talks. As key mediator in this long process, Duddy, here codenamed as “June”, writes to McGuinness, stating “The War is indeed over and I sincerely hope you can deliver the peace.”. Further letters from Duddy to McGuiness discuss the problematic process of decommissioning of weapons and as recent as June 2006, a letter from Brendan urges McGuinness to “keep driving the Peace Process forward as you have been doing over the last twenty years.” (pol35_585)

Typescript of letter from Duddy to McGuiness, 1999

The Duddy archive offers an indispensable account of understanding and of previously unknown information about the arduous and lengthy and also at times unsuccessful attempts at stabilising peace in Norther Ireland over nearly forty years. The role of Martin McGuinness in this process can be understood in a broader capacity as this archive is digitally available:

https://digital.library.nuigalway.ie/islandora/object/nuigalway%3Aduddy

Student Reading List Experience - Survey Results




Last semester the Collection Development team ran a survey aimed at undergraduate students. We asked a number of questions on reading list use and how students were finding using the new Reading List System. 

There were 39 respondents across a range of disciplines with the majority coming from the School of Business and Economics. 

Some of the key results were:

  • 95% agreed they are more likely to read items from their reading list when they are easily accessible.
  • 71% agreed or strongly agreed that the Reading List System makes preparing for exams, essays and projects more straightforward.
  • 61% agreed that the Reading List System improved overall engagement with the course module. Some 37% neither agreed or disagreed with the statement.

Survey Comments
As often is the case with surveys, the comments were interesting:
"I think it is a brilliant idea as it allows lecturers to provide students with the books they recommend or have used for a particular topic that is available in the library."
"I have only used the reading list system for one of my modules, but it has cut out the usual fiasco of trawling library search pages which is very helpful. "
          "It's easy to use and reliable."
Some students complained that their reading lists were not updated during the semester or some links to material were unclear. The overall response though is very positive and clearly demonstrates the benefits of the Reading List System for students. It does reinforce the need for the Library and lecturers to work closely together to provide straightforward access to course materials in a thorough and consistent manner.

For more information including guides and online tutorials see the Reading List page.

Collection Development